Logo


BackHome

 

Revell Engine Kits

I first spotted these kits a while back after helping a mate search for model engines as he wanted to put one in a model boat of his. I've found it pretty hard trying to get hold of them. They are mainly stocked in the USA. With the currency rate and shipping, the engines came to around £20 each which to me is bargain. There is a UK supplier on the internet selling 2 types of kit for around £30 and then theres the postage to go on top. Getting hold of all the kits in the range is going to be a long term thing so stay tuned!

The kits are all pre-painted and require piecing it all together with use of superglue and screws! They are easy to assemble and dont really prove to be a challenge, however they do make attractive shelf displays when complete. The engines are all 1:6th scale unless stated otherwise.

Click below for the build of the engines:

 

Ford 427 SOHC

 

 

 

Coming Soon!

 

 

 

Click Below For The Build

 

 

 

 

Coming Soon!

 

 

 

Download The Manual

 

Ford 427 Wedge

Designed and built for high performance, the Ford 427 brought Ford most of its success in the 60's; Fords most successful racing decade. Ford rolled onto the racetrack in serious fashion sporting the 427 engine under the hood of the Galaxie. The Ford 427 engine was used in stock cars which dominated stock car racing in the 60's. The top oiler version was introduced first and it delivered oil to the cams first and the crank second. Later, in 1965, the side oiler block was introduced, which sent the oil to the crank first and the cams second. With the high popularity today, the engines need very little modification of any sort to meet the most rigorous of street, strip or off-road demands.

Click Below For The Build

Download The Manual

 

Dodge 426 Hemi Street Engine

When the 426 Hemi was introduced in 1964, it was strictly a racing engine. The street version differed from its racing cousin by virtue of a lower compression ration (10.25:1), milder valve timing and different intake and exhaust manifolds. For reliability, cast iron heads were used instead of aluminum. Throughout its eight year production life, very little changed inside the 426 Hemi. Chrysler never changed the engines advertised horsepower and torque ratings, which stood at 425hp at 5000 rpm and 490 foot-pounds of torque at 4000rpm. Thanks to its exciting track record, the original 426 Hemi remains one of the most famous engines in automotive history.

 

Click Below For The Build

 

 

 

Coming Soon!

 

 

 

 

Download The Manual

 

1:4th Visible V8 Engine

A V8 engine is a V engine with eight cylinders mounted on the crankcase in two banks of four cylinders, in most cases set at a right angle to each other but sometimes at a narrower angle, with all eight pistons driving a common crankshaft.

In its simplest form, it is basically two straight-4 engines sharing a common crankshaft. However, this simple configuration, with a single-plane crankshaft, has the same secondary dynamic imbalance problems as two straight-4s, resulting in vibrations in large engine displacements. As a result, since the 1920s most V8s have used the somewhat more complex crossplane crankshaft with heavy counterweights to eliminate the vibrations. This results in an engine which is smoother than a V6, while being considerably less expensive than a V12 engine. Racing V8s continue to use the single plane crankshaft because it allows faster acceleration and more efficient exhaust system designs.

Click Below For The Build

Download The Manual

 

Back

©Dan Walker